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Definition of Velour


US English version

Fibre: Cotton, wool, or spun rayon.

Weave: Thick, plush pile, with a plain or satin ground, or sometimes knitted.

Characteristics: The pile is characterised by uneven lengths (usually two) which gives it a rough look. The two lengths of pile create light and shaded areas on the surface. A rather pebbled effect. This type of velour was invented and made in Lyons, France, in 1844. "Velours" is the French term for velvet. "Cotton velour" is simply cotton velvet.

Uses: Hats, dressing gowns, dresses, waist-coats, upholstery. Now most commonly sold as knit velour.



Derivation: French velours ‘velvet’ via Old French velour, velous from Latin villosus ‘hairy’, from villus: see VELVET

Definition of Velour


UK English version

Fiber: Cotton, wool, or spun rayon.

Weave: Thick, plush pile, with a plain or satin ground, or sometimes knitted.

Characteristics: The pile is characterized by uneven lengths (usually two) which gives it a rough look. The two lengths of pile create light and shaded areas on the surface. A rather pebbled effect. This type of velour was invented and made in Lyons, France, in 1844. "Velours" is the French term for velvet. "Cotton velour" is simply cotton velvet.

Uses: Hats, dressing gowns, dresses, waist-coats, upholstery. Now most commonly sold as knit velour.



Derivation: French velours ‘velvet’ via Old French velour, velous from Latin villosus ‘hairy’, from villus: see VELVET


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